Type of Credibility

Week Four – Activity Presumed Credibility The Edith Cowan University Website is an example of what can be considered as Presumed, because the website is used for a University with the attached domain name …edu.au. http://www.ecu.edu.au/ Surface Credibility Surface sites are pages that aesthetically pleasing at first notice, rather than depending on the url. An example of this…

What Makes it Trustworthy?

Week Four – Question Three As Fogg explain in his article (Credibility and the World Wide Web, 2003, pp. 147‐181), that the world-wide web has grown dramatically between the time frame of 1999 to 2002, society are becoming so common with online information that they become less questionable of websites credibility. The following dot points inform…

Wikipedia… To Use or Not to Use? That is the Question

Week Four – Question Two Wikipedia is a free online encyclopaedia created by a series of individuals working collaboratively to inform the community. Anyone who has a registered account can create, publish and edit a document. However, you do not need a profile to edit a document anonymously. This is the major reason why Wikipedia is…

Why is Credibility Important?

WEEK FOUR – QUESTION ONE It is important for individuals to evaluate websites as it is possible that certain information can be inaccurate and untrustworthy. Across the billions of websites online there is a percentage that aren’t legitimate. A website that lacks both or either of the elements of trustworthiness and expertise, can’t be held credibly…

Consistency in Everyday Life

Week Two – Question Two / Activity All over the world the male and female toilet signs are consistent.(Figure 1) No matter the individuals first language the use of a symbol makes it easy for people to know which door to use. Although the figures design varies the formalised layout stays constant. They usually consist…

What Does Consistency Offer?

Week Two – Question One For Lidwell, Holden and Butler consistency is when a system’s features are consistent and similar, the usability increases. Consistency is defined by the Random House Dictionary (2017) as “steadfast adherence to the same principles, course, form, etc.” With the reoccurring choices in colour and text a design can have a long-lasting…

What are Some Examples of Everyday Objects that Reduce Performance Load?

Week Three – Activity The first example of an everyday object that reduces the performance load is the very accessible laptop. (Figure 1) No matter the brand, each laptops function is to make the creating of documents and work easier, while allowing access to the internet. Prior to the design, individuals would have to use…

Psychology’s Role in Performance Load

Week Three – Question Three Studying psychology is essential when creating an effective visual design. The attributes of psychology within the design can help the designer connect with the goal and the target audience on a greater level. Using psychology is useful as every design has an underlining meaning or motive. Understanding the human psychology…

What is CHUNKING???

  Week 3 Question 2 The authors (Lidwell, Holden, & Butler, Performance Load, 2003) use the word “Chunking” as a possible solution to over worked performance loads. The term is defined as a strategy of breaking down large sums of information into smaller amounts that is structured systematically into collections. Using the chunking theory, it…

The Theory of Performance Load

Week Three – Question One : This expositive extract by (Lidwell, Holden, & Butler, Performance Load, 2003) explores the ideas surrounding the theory of performance loads. Performance loads involves the mental and physical actions required to achieve the task convoluted. The theory is that if the performance load required is high there is weaker chance…

Aesthetic‐Usability Effect Examples

Week One – Activity Aesthetic-Usability Effect can be seen in everyday products. For example, the wrist watch; while the watch has a common attribute of telling time in easy motions of glancing at their wrist, when a design is more aesthetically pleasing the individual is willing to become better attached to the product and brand….

Aesthetic-Usability Effect

Week One – Question One   The article Aesthetic-Usability Effect (Lidwell, Holden, & Butler, Aesthetic‐Usability Effect, 2003) is an informational document that educates the reader on how a well presented and aesthetically pleasing designs are often more accepted by the individual. The article addresses how an appealing design whether that be for a website, a…